Wednesday, March 14, 2012


Robert Browning Studios - Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

Listed below are frequently asked questions concerning everything from musical concepts to our lesson policies. If you have a question about something, look here first before submitting it. It may already be answered.


Q. Why aren't there make-up classes or monthly tuition adjustments made if a student misses a class?

A. First of all, the design of our teaching program places you into an appropriate class for your age and level. As these classes are limited in size, the complications of finding a suitable spot other than your scheduled time would be nearly impossible. Secondly, It helps to keep the cost of the lessons at an affordable level. By reducing scheduling, billing, and bookkeeping man hours, we can offer a cost effective flat monthly rate, that is simple to understand and keep track of. All of this was taken under consideration when developing our rate plan and over the years has proven to be a very successful, highly competitive, and affordable way for you to pursue music education.

Q. In regard to no make up classes what happens if you...the instructor.. have to cancel a class for some reason?

A. Well I must say it has happened in the past. But in the 20 or so years that I've taught, it probably hasn't occurred more than 3 or 4 times at the most. Of course if I have to cancel for any reason, a make-up class will be offered for that particular situation. If a convenient time for everyone cannot be agreed upon, the tuition will be adjusted for the following month.

Q. What about severe weather conditions and cancelled classes?

A. Severe weather.... power outages.... snow... etc. Fall under the category of uncontrollable circumstances and are not subject to make up classes or tuition adjustment. Rule of thumb. If the local schools are are we!

Q. I want to play electric guitar. Everyone tells me I should learn on an acoustic. Is this true and why?

A. The common belief in days of old was that learning on an acoustic would strengthen your hands....which it does by the way...and that it would toughen your fingertips....also true. However, there is no musical advantage to starting on either...actually, electrics are generally easier to play which makes the learning process much more enjoyable and it is easier to get to the higher frets on the neck. There are attributes to each type of guitar, but in my opinion, it makes not a bit of difference which you learn on. If you stay with it, eventually, you will have at least one of each anyway!

Q. Why do you teach so much theory? Is it really all that important?

A. We teach theoretical concepts so that students and players not only know the how of what they are doing, but also the why. Yes I think it is very very important. At least in my career it has allowed me playing jobs that without it I couldn't have handled, nor would I have gotten. There are many many fine players who know very little theory if any, but in my opinion they have an exceptional musical gift. The average person will do much better on their instrument and go much further musically with a strong theory background than without.

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